throttle bandwidth with cstream

tar -cj /backup | cstream -t 777k | ssh host 'tar -xj -C /backup'
this bzips a folder and transfers it over the network to "host" at 777k bit/s. cstream can do a lot more, have a look http://www.cons.org/cracauer/cstream.html#usage for example: echo w00t, i'm 733+ | cstream -b1 -t2 hehe :)

24
By: wires
2009-07-02 10:05:53

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  • Trickle is a voluntary, cooperative bandwidth shaper. it works entirely in userland and is very easy to use. The most simple application is to limit the bandwidth usage of programs.


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  • in Debian-based systems apt-get could be limited to the specified bandwidth in kilobytes using the apt configuration options(man 5 apt.conf, man apt-get). I'd quote man 5 apt.conf: "The used bandwidth can be limited with Acquire::http::Dl-Limit which accepts integer values in kilobyte. The default value is 0 which deactivates the limit and tries uses as much as possible of the bandwidth..." "HTTPS URIs. Cache-control, Timeout, AllowRedirect, Dl-Limit and proxy options are the same as for http..."


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What Others Think

I'd never heard of cstream. What a gem!
flatcap · 467 weeks and 6 days ago
Like cpipe, but more!
bwoodacre · 467 weeks and 6 days ago
sawwweet! Heck yeah!
linuxrawkstar · 467 weeks and 6 days ago
It's nice to control the bandwidth!
luqmanux · 467 weeks and 6 days ago
Is there a way of doing this system wide? Lets say, I want to restrict the total upload bandwidth of my own computer so I never take all space, leaving some kbps for my ATA =)
irae · 467 weeks and 4 days ago
@irae: i only know "class based queuing" (there might be some better way), this is in the linux advanced routing howto http://lartc.org/howto/lartc.qdisc.html HTH
wires · 467 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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