Quick alias for case-insensitive grep

alias grip="grep -i"
This is *NOT* about the -i option in grep. I guess everybody already knows that option. This is about the basic rule of life that the simplest things are sometimes the best. ;-) One day when I used "grep -i" for the umpteenth time, I decided to make this alias, and I've used it ever since, probably more often than plain grep. (In fact I also have aliases egrip and fgrip defined accordingly. I also have wrip="grep -wi" but I don't use this one that often.) If you vote this down because it's too trivial and simplistic, that's no problem. I understand that. But still this is really one of my most favourite aliases.

-3
By: inof
2009-07-21 11:12:15

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What Others Think

I know what you mean. It's not technically complex, but I still like the idea of sharing *how* people use things on this site.
jdob · 461 weeks and 5 days ago
This is now in my .bashrc because I never use grep without the -i option anyway.
Ben · 461 weeks and 5 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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