find files in $PATH that were not installed through dpkg

echo -e "${PATH//://\n}" >/tmp/allpath; grep -Fh -f /tmp/allpath /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list|grep -vxh -f /tmp/allpath >/tmp/installedinpath ; find ${PATH//:/ } |grep -Fxv -f /tmp/installedinpath
OS: Debian based (or those that use dpkg) Equivalent to doing a dpkg -S on each file in $PATH, but way faster. May report files generated though postinstall scripts and such. For example . It will report /usr/bin/vim .. which is not not a file installed directly by dpkg, but a link generated by alternatives hooks

0
By: kamathln
2009-09-09 05:33:14

These Might Interest You

  • If you run dpkg --clear-selections or have otherwise selected installed packages for deinstall, but want to undo it, run this. It will set all installed packages back to installed status so that they won't be removed by commands like "dpkg -Pa"


    0
    dpkg -l | grep ^ri | awk '{print $2 " install"}' | sudo dpkg --set-selections
    ajmccluskey · 2013-11-23 06:41:18 0
  • If the first two letters are "ii", then the package is installed. You can also use wildcards. For example, . dpkg -l openoffice* . Note that dpkg will usually not report packages which are available but uninstalled. If you want to see both which versions are installed and which versions are available, use this command instead: . apt-cache policy python Show Sample Output


    1
    dpkg -l python
    hackerb9 · 2011-01-05 06:15:13 1
  • I wanted to view only executables installed by a package. This seemed to work. There's got to be easier way, please share. Note: (1) Replace iptables with the package name of your interest (2) The command will trash any existing environment variable named 'lst' (3) Instead if you are interested in viewing just .ko or .so files installed by this package, then that would be easy: $ dpkg -L iptables | grep "\.[sk]o$" Show Sample Output


    1
    lst=`dpkg -L iptables` ; for f in $lst; do if [ -x $f ] && [ ! -d $f ] ; then echo $f; fi; done;
    b_t · 2010-10-30 14:47:45 1
  • Calculates the size on disk for each package installed on the filesystem (or removed but not purged). This is missing the | sort -rn which would put the biggest packges on top. That was purposely left out as the command is slightly on the slow side Also you may need to run this as root as some files can only be checked by du if you can read them ;) Show Sample Output


    4
    dpkg --get-selections | cut -f1 | while read pkg; do dpkg -L $pkg | xargs -I'{}' bash -c 'if [ ! -d "{}" ]; then echo "{}"; fi' | tr '\n' '\000' | du -c --files0-from - | tail -1 | sed "s/total/$pkg/"; done
    pykler · 2009-10-12 14:57:54 0

What Others Think

Why negative votes? Didn't it work? You don't like distro specefic commands? Was the command too long? Please tell me.
kamathln · 457 weeks and 4 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

You must be signed in to comment.

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands



Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: