printf "\e[8;70;180;t"

Resize a Terminal Window

Replace 70 with the desired height. Replace 180 with the desired width. I put it in my bashrc, because by default my terminal is too small.

4
By: jearsh
2010-01-07 05:58:16

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  • Run the alias command, then issue ps aux | tail and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand. ${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the default of 80. The default for TAIL is to output the last 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the last x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 7. The -7 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used TAIL, ie the prompt. Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html ) 275MB/748MB [7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~ In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device. Show Sample Output


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    alias head='head -n $((${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} - 2))'
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What Others Think

Neat. :) Under MacOS using Terminal, if you set the height and width to absurdly huge values, this will perfectly fullscreen the Terminal window.
ianh · 436 weeks and 4 days ago
Nice. Of course if you're using gnome-terminal, then there's no need: change the shortcut to run: gnome-terminal --maximize gnome-terminal --full-screen
flatcap · 436 weeks and 4 days ago
Doesn't work in PuTTY on Windows ;oP If you know what size you want to make your xterm (e.g. the 70 & 180) you can start a larger xterm with: xterm -geometry 70x180 (or use -geo for geometry) and place it in the right place on screen with: xterm -geo 70x180+5+10
JohnGH · 436 weeks and 4 days ago
This is typically something I've done by editing /usr/share/vte/termcap/xterm, but that tends to get reset a lot on upgrades. This is good because I can just add it to my .bashrc, which has the added benefit of surviving full reinstalls and new machines (I sync my .bashrc around). Nice :)
jdob · 436 weeks and 3 days ago
Good to know... gnome-terminal will let you say: resize -s 70 180
jimi · 435 weeks and 4 days ago
It would be a lot better to do this with tput(1) -- assuming you have the one from ncurses, at least -- rather than hard-coding the control sequences like that.
SamB · 392 weeks and 6 days ago

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