Iterate through current directory + all subs for C++ header files and rank by # of comments

find ./ -name *.h -exec egrep -cH "// | /\*" {} \; | awk -F':' '{print $2 ":" $1}' | sort -gr
This shows you which files are most in need of commenting (one line of output per file)

1
By: blocky
2010-04-23 19:00:07

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  • Also removes translator comments. You can remove the header by omitting --keep-header, but if your msgids contain non-ASCII characters you will need the header to specify a suitable charset.


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    msgfilter --keep-header --input input.po awk '{}' | sed '/^#$/d; /^#[^\:\~,\.]/d' >empty.po
    seanf · 2013-02-08 08:05:32 0
  • Count your source and header file's line numbers. This ignores blank lines, C++ style comments, single line C style comments. This will not ignore blank lines with tabs or multiline C style comments.


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    find /usr/include/ -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -print0 | xargs -0 cat | grep -v "^ *$" | grep -v "^ *//" | grep -v "^ */\*.*\*/" | wc -l
    unixmonkey44446 · 2013-06-17 08:37:37 0
  • A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session. Show Sample Output


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    comment() { echo "" > /dev/null; }
    bartonski · 2010-05-03 16:14:04 5
  • Show disk space info, grepping out the uninteresting ones beginning with ^none while we're at it. The main point of this submission is the way it maintains the header row with the command grouping, by removing it from the pipeline before it gets fed into the sort command. (I'm surprised sort doesn't have an option to skip a header row, actually..) It took me a while to work out how to do this, I thought of it as I was drifting off to sleep last night! Show Sample Output


    0
    df -h | grep -v ^none | ( read header ; echo "$header" ; sort -rn -k 5)
    purpleturtle · 2011-03-16 14:25:45 1

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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