Sort output by length of line

sortwc () { local L;while read -r L;do builtin printf "${#L}@%s\n" "$L";done|sort -n|sed -u 's/^[^@]*@//'; }
This provides a way to sort output based on the length of the line, so that shorter lines appear before longer lines. It's an addon to the sort that I've wanted for years, sometimes it's very useful. Taken from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html
Sample Output
[32292:32291 0:1072] 04:08:37 Thu May 20 [bigdaddy@www.askapache.com:/dev/pts/1 +1] /chroot/master
(1:1072)# locate .bash_profile|sortwc
/etc/skel/.bash_profile
/home/warbucks/.bash_profile
/home/fiberoptic/.bash_profile
/home/srot/.backups/.bash_profile
/root/.backups/htaccess/.bash_profile
/.mysnapshot/weekly.0/etc/skel/.bash_profile
/.mysnapshot/monthly.0/etc/skel/.bash_profile
/.mysnapshot/nightly.0/etc/skel/.bash_profile

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What Others Think

Have you a real use case for sorting by line length?
pixelbeat · 418 weeks and 2 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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