type partial command, kill this command, check something you forgot, yank the command, resume typing.

<ctrl+u> [...] <ctrl+y>
Example : vim /etc/fstab ## damn <ctrl+u> sudo <ctrl+y> ## like a boss. Example 2 : sudo vim /root/bin/ ##uh... autocomplete doesn't work... <ctrl+u> sudo ls /root/bin ##ah! that's the name of the file! <ctrl+y> sudo vim /root/bin/ ##resume here! Thanks readline!

197
2010-07-23 03:33:46

1 Alternatives + Submit Alt

What Others Think

Also helpful, for me: - to have last argument of previous commands in history - to search history - for "undo"
lucafaus · 412 weeks and 6 days ago
This is awesome! I find it useful in combination with (to search history). For some reason when I search for a previous command I often realize I need to do something first before I run it.
randy909 · 412 weeks and 1 day ago
Edit to previous comment: I find it useful in combination with ctrl-r (to search history)...
randy909 · 412 weeks and 1 day ago
The only downside is that it doesn't show up in your history, and you may override your copy buffer. A slightly safer (albeit more complicated) way to manage this is to do Ctrl-a to take you to the beginning of the line, then put a # (comment character) in front of the command and hit enter. Now you can recall the command through history and modify it by using Ctrl-a to go to the beginning again and remove the #.
javidjamae · 334 weeks and 1 day ago
trully like a boss
kruspemsv · 314 weeks and 1 day ago
I doesn't show in history because the command wasn't executed, which seems entirely correct behavior, and such opperation go to the cutbuffer. Anyhow, with zsh you can do the following to use the cutbuffer: Esc-q Esc-g
khayyam · 273 weeks and 6 days ago
use ctrl+a to jump to start of the line
araslanov_e · 199 weeks and 3 days ago

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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