Take a screenshot of the window the user clicks on and name the file the same as the window title

sleep 4; xwd >foo.xwd; mv foo.xwd "$(dd skip=100 if=foo.xwd bs=1 count=256 2>/dev/null | egrep -ao '^[[:print:]]+' | tr / :).xwd"
In general, this is actually not better than the "scrot -d4" command I'm listing it as an alternative to, so please don't vote it down for that. I'm adding this command because xwd (X window dumper) comes with X11, so it is already installed on your machine, whereas scrot probably is not. I've found xwd handy on boxen that I don't want to (or am not allowed to) install packages on. NOTE: The dd junk for renaming the file is completely optional. I just did that for fun and because it's interesting that xwd embeds the window title in its metadata. I probably should have just parsed the output from file(1) instead of cutting it out with dd(1), but this was more fun and less error prone. NOTE2: Many programs don't know what to do with an xwd format image file. You can convert it to something normal using NetPBM's xwdtopnm(1) or ImageMagick's convert(1). For example, this would work: "xwd | convert fd:0 foo.jpg". Of course, if you have ImageMagick already installed, you'd probably use import(1) instead of xwd. NOTE3: Xwd files can be viewed using the X Window UnDumper: "xwud <foo.xwd". ImageMagick and The GIMP can also read .xwd files. Strangely, eog(1) cannot. NOTE4: The sleep is not strictly necessary, I put it in there so that one has time to raise the window above any others before clicking on it.
Sample Output
# No output, but the cursor will change to crosshairs to let you know that you can select a window

3
By: hackerb9
2010-09-19 08:03:02

1 Alternatives + Submit Alt

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Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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