tail -f ~/.bash_history

Watch end of files real time, especially log files

Changes are displayed when they are written to the file to exit
Sample Output
$ tail -f /home/ubuntu/.bash_history 
uptime 
echo hello
exit

-1
By: totti
2011-09-15 19:35:09

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What do you think?

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