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Commands by RanyAlbeg from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by RanyAlbeg - 15 results
vimhtml() { [[ -f "$1" ]] || return 1; vim +'syn on | run! syntax/2html.vim | wq | q' "$1";}
2013-05-12 19:30:51
User: RanyAlbeg
Functions: return vim
4

``vimhtml somefile.txt`` will open vim for the HTML convertion and close it immediately after its done, leaving you with somefile.html which you can later use in your website or whatever.

feh --bg-scale /path/to/wallpaper.jpg
whichpath() { local -A path; local c p; for c; do p=$(type -P "$c"); p=${p%/*}; path[${p:-/}]=1; done; local IFS=:; printf '%s\n' "${!path[*]}"; }
2011-09-16 15:55:15
User: RanyAlbeg
Functions: printf type
0

I find it useful when I want to add another crontab entry and I need to specify the appropriate PATH.

I give ''whichpath'' a list of programs that I use inside my script and it gives me the PATH I need to use for this script.

''whichpath'' uses associative array, therefore you should have Bash v4 in order to run it.

See sample output.

wiki() { local IFS=_; dig +short txt "${*^}".wp.dg.cx; }
bash --rcfile /a/special/bashrc
read -ra words <<< "<sentence>" && echo "${words[@]^}"
say() { local IFS=+;mplayer "http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?q=$*"; }
get_duration () { IFS=.: read -r _ h m s _ < <(ffmpeg -i "$1" 2>&1 | grep Duration);echo $(( h * 3600 + m * 60 + s )); }
ff() { local IFS='|'; grep -rinE "$*" . ; }
2011-06-10 10:25:10
User: RanyAlbeg
Functions: grep
14

Grep will read the contents of each file in PWD and will use the REs $1 $2 ... $n to match the contents.

In case of match, grep will print the appropriate file, line number and the matching line.

It's just easier to write

ff word1 word2 word3

Instead of

grep -rinE 'word1|word2|word3' .
for i in ./*foo*;do mv -- "$i" "${i//foo/bar}";done
2011-04-30 14:26:05
User: RanyAlbeg
Functions: mv
8

That is an alternative to command 8368.

Command 8368 is EXTREMELY NOT clever.

1) Will break also for files with spaces AND new lines in them AND for an empty expansion of the glob '*'

2) For making such a simple task it uses two pipes, thus forking.

3) xargs(1) is dangerous (broken) when processing filenames that are not NUL-terminated.

4) ls shows you a representation of files. They are NOT file names (for simple names, they mostly happen to be equivalent). Do NOT try to parse it.

Why? see this :http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs

Recursive version:

find . -depth -name "*foo*" -exec bash -c 'for f; do base=${f##*/}; mv -- "$f" "${f%/*}/${base//foo/bar}"; done' _ {} +
declare -f <function name>
2011-04-07 12:35:38
User: RanyAlbeg
4

I often write a one-liner which I want to use later in a script.

rm -r .[!.]*
arr[i*100+j]="whatever"
2011-02-18 00:47:25
User: RanyAlbeg
8

Since Bash doesn't support two-dimensional arrays, you can limit your columns length by some big enough constant value ( in this example 100 ) and then index the array with i and j, or maybe write your own get() and set() methods to index the array properly like I implemented for example ( see Sample output ).

For example for i=0 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [0,99] in the one-dimensional array.

For i=1 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [100,199].

And so on.

Be careful when using this, and remember that in fact you are always using one-dimensional array.

rmall_but() { declare -A keep;for arg;do keep[${arg%/}]=1;done;for file in *;do [[ ${keep[$file]} ]] || rm -rf "$file";done; }
rm -f !(survivior.txt)