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Commands by totoro from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by totoro - 6 results
% screen -r someuser/
2009-03-25 23:59:38
User: totoro
Functions: screen
38

If you enable multiuser, then you can permit others to share your screen session. The following conditions apply:

1. screen must be suid root;

2. "multiuser on" must be configured in ~/.screenrc;

3. control the others user(s) access with "aclchg":

# ----- from ~/.screenrc-users -----

aclchg someuser +rx "#?" #enable r/o access to "someuser"

aclchg someuser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow these

aclchg otheruser +rwx "#?" # enable r/w access to "otheruser"

aclchg otheruser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow them to use these commands

# -----

After doing this (once), you start your session with:

$ screen

Then, the other user can join your terminal session(s) with youruserid:

$ screen -r youruserid/

Note: the trailing "/" is required.

Multiple users can share the same screen simultaneously, each with independent access controlled precisely with "aclchg" in the ~/.screenrc file.

I use the following setup:

# ~/.screenrc-base

# default screenrc on any host

source $HOME/.screenrc-base

source $HOME/.screenrc-$HOST

source $HOME/.screenrc-users

# -----

Then, the base configurations are in ~/.screenrc-base; the host-specific configurations are in ~/.screenrc-$HOST, and the user configurations are in ~/.screenrc-users.

The host-specific .screenrc file might contain some host-specific screen commands; e.g.:

# ~/.screen-myhost

# -----

screen -t 'anywhere' /bin/tcsh

screen -t 'anywhere1' /bin/tcsh

# ----

The .screenrc-base contains:

# ~/.screenrc-base

## I find typing ^a (Control-a) awkward. So I set the escape key to CTRL-j instead of a.

escape ^Jj

termcapinfo xterm* ti@:te@:

autodetach on

zombie kr

verbose on

multiuser on

rsync -avz -e 'ssh -A sshproxy ssh' srcdir remhost:dest/path/
2009-03-25 21:29:07
User: totoro
Functions: rsync
5

If you have lots of remote hosts sitting "behind" an ssh proxy host, then there is a special-case use of "rsynch" that allows one to easily copy directories and files across the ssh proxy host, without having to do two explicit copies: the '-e' option allows for a replacement "rsh" command. We use this option to specify an "ssh" tunnel command, with the '-A' option that causes authentication agent requests to be forwarded back to the local host. If you have ssh set up correctly, the above command can be done without any passwords being entered.

function crtonl { perl -i -ape 's/\r/\n/g;' $* ; }
2009-03-25 20:28:32
User: totoro
Functions: perl
Tags: files
-2

Many Mac OS X programs, especially those in Microsoft:Office, create ASCII files with lines terminated by CRs (carriage returns). Most Unix programs expect lines separated by NLs (newlines). This little command makes it trivial to convert them.

function headers { head -1 $* | tr ',' '\12' | pr -t -n ; }
2009-03-25 20:07:47
User: totoro
Functions: head pr tr
Tags: CSV headers
0

This little command (function) shows the CSV header fields (which are field names separated by commas) as an ordered list, clearly showing the fields and their order.

function t { ls -ltch $* | head -20 ; }
2009-03-25 20:05:52
User: totoro
Functions: head ls
0

Coming back to a project directory after sometime elsewhere?

Need to know what the most recently modified files are?

This little function "t" is one of my most frequent commands.

I have a tcsh alias for it also:

alias t 'ls -ltch \!* | head -20'

find . -type f -depth -3 -mtime -5
2009-03-25 19:54:06
User: totoro
Functions: find
-2

Ever wanted to find the most recently modified files, but couldn't remember exactly where they were in a project directory with many subdirectories? The "find" command, using a combination of "-mtime -N" and "-depth -D" can be used to find those files. If your directory structure isn't very deep, just omit the "-depth -D", but if your directory structure is very deep, then you can limit the depth of the traversal using "-depth -D", where "D" is the maximum number of directory levels to descend.