Commands by Davvolun (1)

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List your sudo rights
List the commands you have the right to use with sudo.

create screencast (record text and audio simultaneously) using 'script' and 'arecord'
This shell function takes a single argument, which is used as the base name of the .wav, .timing and .session files created. To create a screencast: $ screencast test type and talk ... then type 'exit' or to exit the screencast. test.wav will contain the audio from your screencast. test.session will contain text and control characters needed to paint the screen test.timing will contain timing information needed to synch individual keystrokes in test.session with the audio. to play back: $ aplay test.wav & scriptreplay test.{timing,session} NOTE: because the shell function uses the variable "$!", and bash likes to expand '!' during history expansion, you will need to turn off bash's history before you enter the shell function. This can be achieved using the command $set +H

drop first column of output by piping to this

Piping Microphone Audio Over Netcat
Send microphone audio to another computer using netcat and arecord. Connect to the stream using "nc [other ip] 3333|aplay" You can set up two-way communication by piping audio the reverse direction on another port: Machine #1: $arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc -l 3333 &;nc -l 3334|aplay Machine #2: $$ip=[machine1_ip];arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc $ip 3334 &;nc $ip 3333|aplay

Lookup hostname for IP address

What is my ip?

Use tee to process a pipe with two or more processes
Tee can be used to split a pipe into multiple streams for one or more process to work it. You can add more " >()" for even more fun.

Make .bashrc function to backup the data you changed last houres
The original overwrites any previous backups, and only saves exactly the last hours worth, but not 1 hour + 1 minute. This version creates or appends files, and backs up everything since the last backup (using the backups timestamp as the reference), plus it uses TMPDIR if set.

loop over a set of items that contain spaces
If you want to operate on a set of items in Bash, and at least one of them contains spaces, the `for` loop isn't going to work the way you might expect. For example, if the current dir has two files, named "file" and "file 2", this would loop 3 times (once each for "file", "file", and "2"): $ for ITEM in `ls`; do echo "$ITEM"; done Instead, use a while loop with `read`: $ ls | while read ITEM; do echo "$ITEM"; done

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).


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