Commands by HorsePunchKid (2)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Copy stdin to your X11 buffer
Have you ever had to scp a file to your work machine in order to copy its contents to a mail? xclip can help you with that. It copies its stdin to the X11 buffer, so all you have to do is middle-click to paste the content of that looong file :)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Monitor cpu freq and temperature
This is maybe helpfull from system overheat on your linux box

create SQL-statements from textfile with awk
inputfile.txt is a space-separated textfile, 1st column contains the items (id) I want to put into my SQL statement. 39 = charactercode for single tick ' $1 = first column If inputfile.txt is a CSV-file separated by "," use FS= to define your own field-separator: $ awk 'BEGIN {FS=","; }{printf "select * from table where id = %c%s%c;\n",39,$1,39; }' inputfile.txt

Find files that have been modified on your system in the past 60 minutes
Useful mainly for debugging or troubleshooting an application or system, such as X11, Apache, Bind, DHCP and others. Another useful switch that can be combined with -mmin, -mtime and so forth is -daystart. For example, to find files that were modified in the /etc directory only yesterday: $ sudo find /etc -daystart -mtime 1 -type f

get a random 0/1, use it for on/off, yes/no
use it to add a random boolean switch to your script

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Generate Random Text based on Length
Random text of length "$1" without the useless cat command.

Report all quota usage
Check disk quota for all user

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: