Commands by LyscmdFUer (1)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Easily find latex package documentation
If the pdf/dvi/etc documentation for a latex package is already part of your local texmf tree, then texdoc will find and display it for you. If the documentation is not available on your system, it will bring up the package's webpage at CTAN to help you investigate.

Watch the progress of 'dd'
need pv (pipe view) : http://www.ivarch.com/programs/pv.shtml

show current directory
Opens a file or URL in the user's preferred application.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

A bit of privacy in .bash_history
Don't track in history commands starting with whitespace. Moreover ignore duplicates from history. To be set in .bashrc ex. $ export HISTCONTROL=ignoreboth $   echo antani $   history|grep -c antani 0

Filter IP's in apache access logs based on use
The first sort is necessary for ips in a list to be actually unique.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Display a block of text: multi-line grep with perl
-n reads input, line by line, in a loop sending to $_ Equivalent to while () { mycode } -e execute the following quoted string (i.e. do the following on the same line as the perl command) the elipses .. operator behaves like a range, remembering the state from line to line.

What is the use of this switch ?
e.g. $ manswitch grep -o This will take you to the relevant part of the man page, so you can see the description of the switch underneath.


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