Commands by Stolas (1)

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Take a file as input (two columns data format) and sum values on the 2nd column for all lines that have the same value in 1st column
Example: $ cat

Comment out a line in a file
This will comment out a line, specified by line number, in a given file.

ignore hidden directory in bash completion (e.g. .svn)
add it in ~/.bashrc install bash-completion

Email yourself after a job is done
This is a two part command that comes in really handy if you're running commands that take longer than you're willing to wait. The commands are separated by the semicolon(;) The first command is whatever you're attempting to do. The second commands emails you after the job completes.

Print ASCII Character Chart
Prints out an ascii chart using builtin bash! Then formats using cat -t and column. The best part is: $ echo -e "${p: -3} \\0$(( $i/64*100 + $i%64/8*10 + $i%8 ))"; From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/ascii-codes-and-reference.html

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Get current Xorg resolution via xrandr

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

vimdiff to remotehost
vimdiff to remotehost

Redirect STDIN
Several times, I find myself hitting my up arrow, and changing the search term. Unfortunately, I find myself wasting too much time typing: $ grep kernel /var/log/messages Redirecting STDIN allows me to put the search term at the end so I less cursor movement to change what I'm searching for: $ < /var/log/messages grep kernel If you're using the emacs keyboard binding, then after you press your up arrow, press CTRL+w to erase the word. If this has already been submitted, I couldn't find it with the search utility.


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