Commands by Valise (2)

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remove recursively all txt files with number of lines less than 10

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Steve Reich - Piano Phase; interpreter: Bourne-Again Shell.
The Piano Phase piece, by Steve Reich is a minimalist composition which is played on two pianos played at slightly different tempos, a task that's very difficult to accomplish by human players. The auditive effects produced by the cell displacement produce beautiful patterns. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_Phase . My rendered version: https://ydor.org/SteveReich/piano_phase.mp3 Requires sox to be installed on the system. There are multiple videos on youtube showing different approaches and experiences to this interpretation. There is also a synthesized version. Even if Bash can behave as a powerful pianist, a simple threaded version leaves full room to several time glitches and even negative displacements, the same issues that human pianists experience when playing the piece. The older the computer, the better the chaos added to the result due to the CPU load. Apparently that's the reason Steve Reich composes pieces such as this. Without further ado, please give a warm welcome to the Bash minimalist player on synthesized two-threaded pianos. Please turn off your cellphones.

Get IP from hostname
Get the IP of a hostname.

list your device drivers
great for running off a bootable cd to identify hardware other os's can't detect

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

sed /pat/!d without using sed (no RE; limited to shell patterns aka globbing)
POSIX requires this "string truncating" functionality. might as well use it, at least for very small tasks where invoking sed and using RE is overkill.

Put uppercase letters in curly brackets in a BibTeX database
It is often recommended to enclose capital letters in a BibTeX file in braces, so the letters will not be transformed to lower case, when imported from LaTeX. This is an attempt to apply this rule to a BibTeX database file. DO NOT USE sed '...' input.bib > input.bib as it will empty the file! How it works: $ /^\s*[^@%]/ Apply the search-and-replace rule to lines that start (^) with zero or more white spaces (\s*), followed by any character ([...]) that is *NOT* a "@" or a "%" (^@%). $ s===g Search (s) for some stuff and replace by other stuff. Do that globally (g) for all matches in each processed line. $ \([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\) Matches at least one uppercase letter ([A-Z][A-Z]*) followed by a character that is EITHER not "}" and not a capital letter ([^}A-Z]) OR (|) it actually IS a "}", which is followed by "," at the end of the line ($). Putting regular expressions in escaped parentheses (\( and \), respectively) allows to dereference the matched string later. $ {\1}\2 Replace the matched string by "{", followed by part 1 of the matched string (\1), followed by "}", followed by the second part of the matched string (\2). I tried this with GNU sed, only, version 4.2.1.

Working random fact generator
extension to tali713's random fact generator. It takes the output & sends it to notify-osd. Display time is proportional to the lengh of the fact.


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