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Calculates the number of physical cores considering HyperThreading in AWK
Check whether hyperthreading is enabled or not. a better solution as nproc should work on all OS with awk

Clone or rescue a block device
If you use the logfile feature of ddrescue, the data is rescued very efficiently (only the needed blocks are read). Also you can interrupt the rescue at any time and resume it later at the same point. http://www.gnu.org/software/ddrescue/ddrescue.html

Unzip multiple files with one command
With this command you can easily unzip multiple zip files with just one command. All you need to do is to use single quotes.

VIM: when Ctrl-D and Ctrl-U only scroll one line, reset to default
Resets the scroll parameter to the default (half the rows in the current window). The scroll parameter can be inadvertently set to 1, e..g., if you type '1 Ctrl-D' or '1 Ctrl-U' in normal mode.

repeat any string or char n times without spaces between
(here is character '+' repeated 80 times) Sometimes needed to enhance the title of the script.

extract column from csv file
extracts the 5th column using the delimiter ','

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
The command (above) will remove any duplicate rows based on the FIRST column of data in an un-sorted file. The '$1' represents a positional parameter. You can change both instances of '$1' in the command to remove duplicates based on a different column, for instance, the third: $ awk '{ if ($3 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$3]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt Or you can change it to '$0' to base the removal on the whole row: $ awk '{ if ($0 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$0]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt ** Note: I wouldn't use this on a MASSIVE file, unless you're RAM-rich ;) **

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

watch iptables counters
This will allow you to watch as matches occur in real-time. To filter out only ACCEPT, DROP, LOG..etc, then run the following command: watch 'iptables -nvL | grep -v "0 0" && grep "ACCEPT"' The -v is used to do an inverted filter. ie. NOT "0 0"

Search for a process by name
ps and grep is a dangerous combination -- grep tries to match everything on each line (thus the all too common: grep -v grep hack). ps -C doesn't use grep, it uses the process table for an exact match. Thus, you'll get an accurate list with: ps -fC sh rather finding every process with sh somewhere on the line.


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