Commands by abb (1)

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One-liner to generate Self-Signed SSL Certificate+Key without any annoying prompts or CSRs
Handy if you want to quickly generate a self-signed certificate. Also can be used in your automated scripts for generating quick-use certificates.

Securely destroy data on given device hugely faster than /dev/urandom
This command generates a pseudo-random data stream using aes-256-ctr with a seed set by /dev/urandom. Redirect to a block device for secure data scrambling.

Fork bomb (don't actually execute)
Retrieved from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fork_bomb More info: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/991142/how-does-this-bash-fork-bomb-work

put command in a loop to keep trying a connection
This will keep trying to reconnect your netcat connection can be used with SSH or Telnet, just substitute nc for ssh or telnet very useful for troubleshooting VPNs were you want to send continuous packets towards a destination to trace.

Label EXT2/EXT3 File System

Efficiently extract lines between markers
GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater.

High resolution video screen recording
$ gorecord foo.mp4 I've tried all of the screen recorders available for Linux and this is easily the best. xvidcap segfaults; VNC is too much hassle. There are alternatives of this command already here that I am just too lazy to reply to. Messing with the frames per second option, -r, 25 seems to be the best. Any lower and the video will look like a flipbook, if it records at all - -r 10 won't - any faster is the same, oddly enough. Edit: CLF doesn't like my long command to add audio, so here it is in the description. $ goaddaudio() ${ $if [ $# != 3 ]; then $ echo 'goaddaudio < audio > < src video > < dst video >' $ return $ fi $ $ f=goaddaudio$RANDOM $ ffmpeg -i "$2" &> $f $ d=$( grep Duration $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ',' ) && $ rm $f && $ ffmpeg -i "$1" -i "$2" -r 25 -ab 192k -ar 44100 -sameq -t $d "$3" $}

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Waste time for about 3 minutes
If you're a slow reader and/or you like to ponder, adjust the sleep time to be longer

batch crop images whit ImageMagick
Just starting to get in love with mogrify.


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