Commands by asmaier (1)

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Remove color codes (special characters) with sed

See The MAN page for the last command
This works in bash. The "!!:0" limits the argument to man to be only the first word of the last command. "!!:1" would be the second, etc.

coloured shell prompt
This coloured prompt will show: username in green, grey "@" sign, hostname in red, current directory in yellow, typed commands in green.

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : $ grep &>/dev/null '\' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits

Securely destroy data (including whole hard disks)
GNU shred is provided by the coreutils package on most Linux distribution (meaning, you probably have it installed already), and is capable of wiping a device to DoD standards. You can give shred any file to destroy, be it your shell history or a block device file (/dev/hdX, for IDE hard drive X, for example). Shred will overwrite the target 25 times by default, but 3 is enough to prevent most recovery, and 7 passes is enough for the US Department of Defense. Use the -n flag to specify the number of passes, and man shred for even more secure erasing fun. Note that shredding your shell history may not be terribly effective on devices with journaling filesystems, RAID copies or snapshot copies, but if you're wiping a single disk, none of that is a concern. Also, it takes quite a while :)

Find the package that installed a command

Backup (archive) your Gmail IMAP folders.
Copies an entire hierarchy of mailboxes from the named POP3/IMAP/etc. source to the named destination. Mailboxes are created on the destination as needed. NOTE: The 'mailutil' is Washington's University 'mailutil' (apt-get install uw-mailutils). More examples $ mailutil transfer {imap.gmail.com/ssl/[email protected]}INBOX Gmail/ ; mailutil check imap.gmail.com/ssl/[email protected]}\[Gmail\]/Spam If you use the utility in the first, append -v|-d flag(s) to the end the commands above (man mailutil).

Functions to display, save and restore $IFS
You can display, save and restore the value of $IFS using conventional Bash commands, but these functions, which you can add to your ~/.bashrc file make it really easy. To display $IFS use the function ifs shown above. In the sample output, you can see that it displays the characters and their hexadecimal equivalent. This function saves it in a variable called $saveIFS: $ sifs () { saveIFS=$IFS; } Use this function to restore it $ rifs () { IFS=$saveIFS; } Add this line in your ~/.bashrc file to save a readonly copy of $IFS: $ declare -r roIFS=$IFS Use this function to restore that one to $IFS $ rrifs () { IFS=$roIFS; }

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Create a continuous digital clock in Linux terminal
Source: http://www.my-guides.net/en/guides/linux/364-how-to-create-a-continuous-digital-clock-in-linux-terminal


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