Commands by aysadk (91)

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move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
I think this is less resource consuming than the previous examples

Short and sweet output from dig(1)
Turn off almost all of dig's output except for what you'd see in a zone file. This can also be put into ~/.digrc.

Encrypt and password-protect execution of any bash script, Version 2
(Please see sample output for usage) Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.: myscript --> myscript.crypt You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you. If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string). Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner. Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end. Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

monitor network traffic and throughput in real time
see http://iptraf.seul.org/ for all kinds of documentation and screenshots

Search some text from all files inside a directory

Fix for error perl: warning: Setting locale failed.
Fix for ubuntu error: perl: warning: Setting locale failed. perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings: LANGUAGE = "en_GB:en", LC_ALL = (unset), LANG = "en_GB.UTF-8" are supported and installed on your system. perl: warning: Falling back to the standard locale ("C"). locale: Cannot set LC_CTYPE to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_MESSAGES to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_ALL to default locale: No such file or directory

Debug bash shell scripts.
Display commands and their arguments as they are executed. Useful for debugging shell scripts.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

print all except first collumn


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