Commands by cb0 (1)

  • Sometimes you have a script that needs and inputfile for execution. If you don't want to create one because it may contain only one line you can use the ` mysql -uuser -ppass dbname < <(echo "SELECT * FROM database;") This can be very usefull when working with mysql as I showed in the example code above. This will create a temporary file that is used to execute mysql and for example select all entrys from a specific database.


    9
    any_script.sh < <(some command)
    cb0 · 2010-02-21 18:44:33 13

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