Commands by editorreilly (2)

  • Get your weather from a weather station just blocks from your home. Go to http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/ and find a weather station near you. Click on a temperature bubble for that area. When the window pops up, click on hypertext link with the station ID, then on the bottom right of the page, click on the Current Conditions XML. Thats your link! Good luck! Show Sample Output


    5
    lynx -dump http://api.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXCurrentObXML.asp?ID=KCALOSAN32 | grep GMT | awk '{print $3}'
    editorreilly · 2010-02-05 19:17:18 2
  • I absolutely love this website, and appreciate every contribution. This is the first place I go when I'm stuck, you all have some great ideas. But contributions seem to be slipping a little. If all of us could contribute more code from time to time, this site would be absolutely incredible. Since I'm a relative newcomer to commandline-fu, I don't have the knowledge to contribute much, but I will do what I can.


    -15
    /bin/bash echo -n "Let's POST MORE, PLEASE!"
    editorreilly · 2010-02-05 18:52:45 0

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