Commands by elzapp (4)

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Convert from octal format to umask
Umask is obtained subtracting 7 from each cypher of octal format. I store octal perm format in an array,then for each element of array I subtract 7. The result is the umask.

Parse YouTube url (get youtube video id)
url can be like any one of followings: $url="MejbOFk7H6c" $url="http://youtu.be/MejbOFk7H6c" $url="https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MejbOFk7H6c#t" $url="//www.youtube.com/v/MejbOFk7H6c?hl=ru_RU&version=3&rel=0" $url="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MejbOFk7H6c?feature=player_embedded" If url mismatching, whole url will be returned.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Ease your directory exploration
Usage : tt [OCCURRENCE] tt will display a tree from your actual path tt .svn will display only line containing .svn

Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

Brute force discover
Show the number of failed tries of login per account. If the user does not exist it is marked with *.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Using netcat to copy files between servers
It bypasses encryption overhead of SSH and depending on configuration can be significantly faster. It's recommended to use only in trusted networks.

Do one ping to a URL, I use this in a MRTG gauge graph to monitor connectivity


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