Commands by evaryont (1)

  • The above output is for a custom compiled version of Vim on Arch Linux. Just a quick shell one liner, and presents a list of all the enabled and disabled (those prefixed with a '-') features. Show Sample Output


    2
    vim --version | grep -P '^(\+|\-)' | sed 's/\s/\n/g' | grep -Pv '^ ?$'
    evaryont · 2010-07-02 02:57:19 0

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