Commands by fobos3 (1)

  • Finds duplicates based on MD5 sum. Compares only files with the same size. Performance improvements on: find -not -empty -type f -printf "%s\n" | sort -rn | uniq -d | xargs -I{} -n1 find -type f -size {}c -print0 | xargs -0 md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate The new version takes around 3 seconds where the old version took around 17 minutes. The bottle neck in the old command was the second find. It searches for the files with the specified file size. The new version keeps the file path and size from the beginning.


    2
    find -not -empty -type f -printf "%-30s'\t\"%h/%f\"\n" | sort -rn -t$'\t' | uniq -w30 -D | cut -f 2 -d $'\t' | xargs md5sum | sort | uniq -w32 --all-repeated=separate
    fobos3 · 2014-10-19 02:00:55 1

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