Commands by freeman (2)

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A fun thing to do with ram is actually open it up and take a peek. This command will show you all the string (plain text) values in ram

Merge *.pdf files
Merge all pdf files in the directory into one pdf file (the out.pdf file)

Grab an interface's IP from ifconfig without screen clutter
Sometimes, you don't really care about all the other information that ifconfig spits at you (however useful it may otherwise be). You just want an IP. This strips out all the crap and gives you exactly what you want.

find the biggest files recursively, no matter how many
This command will find the biggest files recursively under a certain directory, no matter if they are too many. If you try the regular commands ("find -type f -exec ls -laSr {} +" or "find -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -laSr") the sorting won't be correct because of command line arguments limit. This command won't use command line arguments to sort the files and will display the sorted list correctly.

List all symbolic links in current directory
For those who don't have the symlinks command, you can use readlink. This command is not straightforward because readlink is very picky. The backslash in front of 'ls' means not to use an alias (e.g. color escape codes from an aliased 'ls' could mess up readlink), and the -1 (one) means to print the entries separated by newlines. xargs -l (the letter L) means to process each input separated by newlines as separate commands.

Find all the links to a file
This command finds and prints all the symbolic and hard links to a file. Note that the file argument itself be a link and it will find the original file as well. You can also do this with the inode number for a file or directory by first using stat or ls or some other tool to get the number like so: $ stat -Lc %i file or $ ls -Hid file And then using: $ find -L / -inum INODE_NUMBER -exec ls -ld {} +

detach remote console for long running operations
Starts midnightcommander and allows you to detach the console; use ctrl-\ to detach Then at a later time you can reconnect using $ dtach -a /tmp/wires-mc In my experience dtach works much better for programs like irssi, mutt, mc, aptitude than screen does.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Take screenshots with imagemagick
Now try this. Ones you see small cross arrow, double click on any window you like to make a screenshot "selectively".

Decode base64-encoded file in one line of Perl
If you are in an environment where you don't have the base64 executable or MIME tools available, this can be very handy for salvaging email attachments when the headers are mangled but the encoded document itself is intact.


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