Commands by fydgit (1)

  • Following in the steps of a few other scripts on here, I thought I'd mix in the ability to add in an instance tag output into this. This can be super useful if you are using the "Name" tag as a hostname tag and feeding that into, say Route53 for DNS to reach the machine. Helps for scripting against later. Show Sample Output


    0
    aws ec2 describe-instances --filters "Name=vpc-id,Values=<replace_with_id>" --query 'Reservations[].Instances[].[ [Tags[?Key==`Name`].Value][0][0],PrivateIpAddress,InstanceId,State.Name,Placement.AvailabilityZone ]' --output table
    fydgit · 2015-08-27 21:52:58 0

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