Commands by hute37 (28)

  • range context (-A -B) search, with exclusion of vcs directories Show Sample Output


    0
    pcregrep -r --exclude_dir='.svn' --include='.*jsp$' -A 2 -B 2 --color "pHtmlHome" .
    hute37 · 2010-12-09 15:26:07 0
  • grep multiline in Perl regexp syntax with pcregrep Show Sample Output


    0
    pcregrep --color -M -N CRLF "owa_pattern\.\w+\W*\([^\)]*\)" source.sql
    hute37 · 2010-11-11 12:53:40 2
  • look at /boot/grub/menu.lst for somethig like: ## additional options to use with the default boot option, but not with the ## alternatives ## e.g. defoptions=vga=791 resume=/dev/hda5 ## defoptions=vga=795 # defoptions=vga=873 ## altoption boot targets option ## multiple altoptions lines are allowed ## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options ## altoptions=(recovery) single # altoptions=(verbose mode) vga=775 debug # altoptions=(console mode) vga=ask # altoptions=(graphic mode) quiet splash # altoptions=(recovery mode) single vga=(decimal value) is framebuffer mode Show Sample Output


    4
    sudo hwinfo --framebuffer
    hute37 · 2010-10-03 14:45:02 0
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Create a backup copy of a MySQL database on the same host
This should probably only be used for testing in a dev environment as it's not terribly efficient, but if you're doing something that might trash a DB and you still want the old data available, this works like a charm.

list files recursively by size

Insert the last argument of the previous command
for example if you did a: $ ls -la /bin/ls then $ ls !$ is equivalent to doing a $ ls /bin/ls

Print number of mb of free ram
Here we instead show a more real figure for how much free RAM you have when taking into consideration buffers that can be freed if needed. Unix machines leave data in memory but marked it free to overwrite, so using the first line from the "free" command will mostly give you back a reading showing you are almost out of memory, but in fact you are not, as the system can free up memory as soon as it is needed. I just noticed the free command is not on my OpenBSD box.

start vim in diff mode
vim will open both files side by side and show colored diffs

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Convert JSON to YAML (unicode safe)
If you tried the other Python version of Convert JSON to YAML and you end up with lines that has "!!python/unicode", this version of the command is for you.

wrap long lines of a text
wraps text lines at the specified width (90 here). -s option is to force to wrap on blank characters -b count bytes instead of columns

Continually monitor things
You can use this one-liner for a quick and dirty (more customizable) alternative to the watch command. The keys to making this work: everything exists in an infinite loop; the loop starts with a clear; the loop ends with a sleep. Enter whatever you'd like to keep an eye on in the middle.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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