Commands by ktoso (3)

  • Yeah I know it's been up here a million times, but this service is a really clean and nice one. Nothing but your IP address on it. Actually I was to write something like this, and noticed this on appspot... ;) Show Sample Output


    23
    curl ip.appspot.com
    ktoso · 2009-10-31 21:11:10 1
  • After executing this, click on a window you want to track X Window events in. Explaination: "xev will track events in the window with the following -id, which we get by greping window information obtained by xwininfo" Show Sample Output


    2
    xev -id `xwininfo | grep 'Window id' | awk '{print $4}'`
    ktoso · 2009-09-19 22:47:16 0
  • Can be used to discover what programms create internet traffic. Skip the part after awk to get more details. Has anyone an idea why the uniq doesn't work propperly here (see sample output)? Show Sample Output


    -1
    netstat -lantp | grep -i establ | awk -F/ '{print $2}' | uniq | sort
    ktoso · 2009-09-19 13:54:36 3

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start a tunnel from some machine's port 80 to your local post 2001
now you can acces the website by going to http://localhost:2001/

Suspend to ram

Setting global redirection of STDERR to STDOUT in a script
You have a script where =ALL= STDERR should be redirected to STDIN and you don't want to add "2>&1" at the end of each command... E.G.: $ ls -al /foo/bar 2>&1 Than just add this piece of code at the beginning of your script! I hope this can help someone. :)

See entire packet payload using tcpdump.

Do some learning...

Edit the Last Changed File

Convert control codes to visible Unicode Control Pictures
Converts control codes and spaces (ASCII code ≤ 32) to visible Unicode Control Pictures, U+2400 ? U+2420. Skips \n characters, which is probably a good thing.

Rename all (jpg) files written as 3 number in 4 numbers.
Useful if you have a list of images called 1 2 3 4 and so on, you can adapt it to rewrite it as 4 (in this example) 0-padded number.

Recover a deleted file
grep searches through a file and prints out all the lines that match some pattern. Here, the pattern is some string that is known to be in the deleted file. The more specific this string can be, the better. The file being searched by grep (/dev/sda1) is the partition of the hard drive the deleted file used to reside in. The ?-a? flag tells grep to treat the hard drive partition, which is actually a binary file, as text. Since recovering the entire file would be nice instead of just the lines that are already known, context control is used. The flags ?-B 25 -A 100? tell grep to print out 25 lines before a match and 100 lines after a match. Be conservative with estimates on these numbers to ensure the entire file is included (when in doubt, guess bigger numbers). Excess data is easy to trim out of results, but if you find yourself with a truncated or incomplete file, you need to do this all over again. Finally, the ?> results.txt? instructs the computer to store the output of grep in a file called results.txt. Source: http://spin.atomicobject.com/2010/08/18/undelete?utm_source=y-combinator&utm_medium=social-media&utm_campaign=technical

ping a host until it responds, then play a sound, then exit
This allows for sleeping in between pings. Also, espeak needs to be installed.


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