Commands by matrtsmiller (1)

  • The idea was originally stolen from Linux Journal. 'wget' pulls the debt clock and 'sed' reformats it for general consumption. Prefacing the command with 'watch' simply sets an interval - in this case every 10 seconds. Show Sample Output


    2
    watch -n 10 "wget -q http://www.brillig.com/debt_clock -O - | grep debtiv.gif | sed -e 's/.*ALT=\"//' -e 's/\".*//' -e 's/ //g'"
    matrtsmiller · 2009-03-26 19:32:57 3

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