Commands by metropolis (6)

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Convert your favorite image in xpm for using in grub
* size must be 640?480 pixels * only has 14 colors * save it in XPM format Edit /boot/grub/menu.lst and add splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/grubimg.xpm make sure for your path name and hard disk

Perl Simple Webserver
First we accept a socket and fork the server. Then we overload the new socket as a code ref. This code ref takes one argument, another code ref, which is used as a callback. The callback is called once for every line read on the socket. The line is put into $_ and the socket itself is passed in to the callback. Our callback is scanning the line in $_ for an HTTP GET request. If one is found it parses the file name into $1. Then we use $1 to create an new IO::All file object... with a twist. If the file is executable("-x"), then we create a piped command as our IO::All object. This somewhat approximates CGI support. Whatever the resulting object is, we direct the contents back at our socket which is in $_[0].

Get OSX Battery percentage
adjusting the field "f1" will give you additional information such as f1 = 98% f2 = discharging f3 = 2:02 remaining

Find size in kilobyte of files that are deleted but still in use and therefore consumes diskspace

view hex mode in vim

Given $PID, print all child processes on stdout
Simpler.

Find unused IPs on a given subnet

Carriage return for reprinting on the same line
The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done

Stream system sounds over rtmp
sox (SOund eXchange) can capture the system audio be it a browser playing youtube or from hardware mic and can pipe it to ffmpeg which encodes it into flv and send it over rtmp. Tested using Red5 rtmp server.

Outputs files with ascii art in the intended form.
Files containing ascii art (e.g. with .nfo extension) are typically not correctly reproduced at the command line when using cat. With iconv one can easily write a wrapper to solve this: $ #!/bin/bash $ if [ -z "[email protected]" ]; then echo "Usage: $(basename $0) file [file] ..." $ else iconv -f437 -tutf8 "[email protected]"; fi $ exit 0


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