Commands by okedialf (2)

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Choose from a nice graphical menu which DI.FM radio station to play
This is a very simple and lightweight way to play DI.FM stations For a more complete version of the command with proper strings in the menu, try: (couldnt fit in the command field above) $zenity --list --width 500 --height 500 --title 'DI.FM' --text 'Pick a Radio' --column 'radio' --column 'url' --print-column 2 $(curl -s http://www.di.fm/ | awk -F '"' '/href="http:.*\.pls.*96k/ {print $2}' | sort | awk -F '/|\.' '{print $(NF-1) " " $0}') | xargs mplayer This command line parses the html returned from http://di.fm and display all radio stations in a nice graphical menu. After the radio is chosen, the url is passed to mplayer so the music can start dependencies: - x11 with gtk environment - zenity: simple app for displaying gtk menus (sudo apt-get install zenity on ubuntu) - mplayer: simple audio player (sudo apt-get install mplayer on ubuntu)

Calculate the distance between two geographic coordinates points (latitude longitude)
The Haversine formula determines the great-circle distance between two points on a sphere given their longitudes and latitudes.

Add all unversioned files to svn
No need for grep, let awk do the match. This will not behave properly if the filenames contains whitespace, which is awk's default field separator.

Efficient count files in directory (no recursion)
$ time perl -e 'if(opendir D,"."){@a=readdir D;print $#a - 1,"\n"}' 205413 real 0m0.497s user 0m0.220s sys 0m0.268s $ time { ls |wc -l; } 205413 real 0m3.776s user 0m3.340s sys 0m0.424s ********* ** EDIT: turns out this perl liner is mostly masturbation. this is slightly faster: $ find . -maxdepth 1 | wc -l sh-3.2$ time { find . -maxdepth 1|wc -l; } 205414 real 0m0.456s user 0m0.116s sys 0m0.328s ** EDIT: now a slightly faster perl version $ perl -e 'if(opendir D,"."){++$c foreach readdir D}print $c-1,"\n"' sh-3.2$ time perl -e 'if(opendir D,"."){++$c foreach readdir D}print $c-1,"\n"' 205414 real 0m0.415s user 0m0.176s sys 0m0.232s

Show CPU usage for EACH cores

Make a zip file with date/time created in the name of the file , zip all sub-directorys
zip -r /tmp/filename-`date +%Y%m%d_%H%M%S`.zip /directory/

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Slow down the screen output of a command
(example above is the 'ls' command with reduced output speed)

add static arp entry to default gateway, arp poison protection

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
Little faster alternative.


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