Commands by ox0spy (3)

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Replace spaces in filenames with underscores
It's the rename-tool from debians perl-package.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list files in mtime order
Simple but useful; list files in the current directory in mtime order. Useful if you've been working on something and then take a day or two off.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

strips the first field of each line where the delimiter is the first ascii character

display an embeded help message from bash script header
With this one liner you can easily output a standard help message using the following convention: Usage: is the start marker Stop at the last #

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Colorize svn stat
Use color escape sequences and sed to colorize the output of svn stat -u. Colors: http://www.faqs.org/docs/abs/HTML/colorizing.html svn stat characters: http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.4/svn-book.html#svn.ref.svn.c.status GNU Extensions for Escapes in Regular Expressions: http://www.gnu.org/software/sed/manual/html_node/Escapes.html

Use tee + process substitution to split STDOUT to multiple commands
Using process substitution, we can 'trick' tee into sending a command's STDOUT to an arbitrary number of commands. The last command (command4) in this example will get its input from the pipe.


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