Commands by quaddo (1)

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Recursively search and replace old with new string, inside every instance of filename.ext
This is a slightly modified version of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/4283/recursive-search-and-replace-old-with-new-string-inside-files (which did not work due to incorrect syntax) with the added option to sed inside only files named filename.ext

The command used by applications in OS X to determine whether a plist is "good". from Ed Marczak.
The check an entire folder is a one-liner: plutil -lint * | grep -v OK$ from Ed Marczak

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Alert visually until any key is pressed

tee to a file descriptor
the tee command does fine with file names, but not so much with file descriptors, such as &2 (stderr). This uses process redirection to tee to the specified descriptor. In the sample output, it's being used to tee to stderr, which is connected with the terminal, and to wc -l, which is also outputting to the terminal. The result is the output of bash --version followed by the linecount

list block level layout

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Rename files in batch

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
* to get the English dictionary: wget http://www.mavi1.org/web_security/wordlists/webster-dictionary.txt

Find broken symlinks and delete them
If you don't want to delete them, but just want to list them, do $ find -L /path -type l If you want to delete them with confirmation first, do $ find -L /path -type l -exec rm -i {} + Using the -L flag follows symlinks, so the -type l test only returns true if the link can't be followed, or is a symlink to another broken symlink.


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