Commands by qubyte (3)

  • Puts words on new lines, removing additional newlines.


    -1
    < <infile> tr ' \t' '\n' | tr -s '\n' > <outfile>
    qubyte · 2009-07-07 01:17:47 2
  • I love CiteULike. It makes keeping a bibtex library easy and keeps all my papers in one place. However, it can be a pain when I add new entries and have to go through the procedure for downloading the new version in my browser, so I made this to grab it for me! I actually pipe it directly into a couple of SED one liners to tidy it up a bit too. Extremely useful, especially if you make a custom BibTeX script that does this first. That way you can sort a fresh BibTeX file for each new paper with no faf. To use just replace with your CiteULike user name. It doesn't download entries that you've hidden but I don't use that feature anyway.


    -1
    curl -o <bibliography> "http://www.citeulike.org/bibtex/user/<user>"
    qubyte · 2009-03-26 23:08:14 0
  • It's sometimes useful to strip the embedded fonts from a pdf, for importing into something like Inkscape. Be warned, this will increase the size of a pdf substantially. I tried this with only gs writing with -sDEVICE=pdfwrite but it doesn't seem to work, so I just pipe postscript output to ps2pdf for the same effect.


    1
    gs -sDEVICE=pswrite -sOutputFile=- -q -dNOPAUSE With-Fonts.pdf -c quit | ps2pdf - > No-Fonts.pdf
    qubyte · 2009-03-25 03:46:00 5

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