Commands by r00t4u (5)

  • running top command in batch mode. it is usefull if you want to redirect the output in a file. Show Sample Output


    2
    top -b -n 1
    r00t4u · 2010-01-24 16:17:30 6

  • -2
    ps ax| awk '/[h]ttpd/{print $1}'| xargs kill -9
    r00t4u · 2009-12-07 09:53:18 5

  • 0
    for i in `mysqladmin -h x.x.x.x --user=root -pXXXX processlist | grep <<username>>| grep <<Locked>>| awk {'print $2'}` do mysqladmin -h x.x.x.x --user=root -pXXX kill $i; done;
    r00t4u · 2009-12-06 05:46:48 4

  • -2
    ps aux| grep -v grep| grep httpd| awk {'print $2'}| xargs kill -9
    r00t4u · 2009-12-06 05:39:50 8
  • this command gives you the total number of memory usuage and open files by the perticuler PID. Show Sample Output


    6
    pmap -d <<pid>>
    r00t4u · 2009-12-06 05:34:46 9

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Find dead symbolic links

find all open files by named process
lists all files that are opened by processess named $processname egrep 'w.+REG' is to filter out non file listings in lsof, awk to get the filenames, and sort | uniq to remove duplciation

List all execs in $PATH, usefull for grepping the resulting list
##Dependancies: bash coreutils Many executables in $PATH have the keyword somewhere other than the beginning in their file names. The command is useful for exploring the executables in $PATH like this. $ find ${PATH//:/ } -executable -type f -printf "%f\n" |grep admin lpadmin time-admin network-admin svnadmin users-admin django-admin shares-admin services-admin

Add timestamp to history
History usually only gives the command number and the command. This will add a timestamp to the history file. Note: this will only put the correct timestamp on commands used after the export is done. You may want to put this in your .bashrc

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Remove multiple spaces
The command removes all the spaces whithin a file and leaves only one space.

Archive a directory with datestamp on filename
A useful bash function: gztardir() { if [ $# -ne 1 ] ; then echo "incorrect arguments: should be gztardir " else tar zcvf "${1%/}-$(date +%Y%m%d-%H%M).tar.gz" "$1" fi }

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Getting the last argument from the previous command


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