Commands by sacrilicious (2)

  • tail would be considered dull, but pair this with being able to push out unix commands over ARD, and life gets easier. (Same can be said for my TimeMachine scrape command, http://xrl.us/begrzb) Show Sample Output


    -3
    tail -n 20 ~/Library/Logs/FileSyncAgent.log
    sacrilicious · 2009-02-19 05:05:21 0
  • While they are few config options and even fewer useful details regarding what actually is being sent by the time machine 'backupd' process, this can at least tell you its doing something, how much it's doing, and exactly how often. Via macosxhints, http://xrl.us/begrwa, which in turn was via comments Show Sample Output


    0
    syslog -F '$Time $Message' -k Sender /System/Library/CoreServices/backupd -k Time ge -72h | tail -n 30
    sacrilicious · 2009-02-19 04:33:25 0

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Configuring proxy client on terminal without leaving password on screen or in bash_history
Prompts the user for username and password, that are then exported to http_proxy for use by wget, yum etc Default user, webproxy and port are used. Using this script prevent the cleartext user and pass being in your bash_history and on-screen

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Shows you how many hours of avi video you have.
midentify.sh is part of mplayer, but you might have to locate it on your box.

Create a system overview dashboard on F12 key
Command binds a set of commands to the F12 key. Feel free to alter the dashboard according to your own needs. How to find the key codes? Type $ read Then press the desired key (example: F5) $ ^[[15~ Try $ bind '"\e[15~"':"\"ssh [email protected]\C-m""" or $ bind '"\e[16~"':"\"apachectl -k restart\C-m"""

Hide or show Desktop Icons on MacOS
Hides all Files and Folders on the MacOS Desktop. To show files and folders, type "true" instead of "false". "Finder" at the end is case sensitive, "finder" doesn’t work

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Spoof your wireless MAC address on OS X to 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6
If you want to check that the spoof worked, type the same command as earlier: $ifconfig en1 | grep ether Now you will see: $ether 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6 For the wired ethernet port: $sudo ifconfig en0 ether 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

How much RAM is Apache using?
Display the amount of memory used by all the httpd processes. Great in case you are being Slashdoted!


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