Commands by shawnjgoff (1)

  • Sprunge.us is a code/text sharing site like pastebin, but it is easy to post stuff from the command line. How it works: :w !command In vim, w writes the current tab to a file when a filename is given afterwards, but if !command is given, the output is piped to the stdin of command. curl -F "sprunge=<-" http://sprunge.us curl is an HTTP client. The -F option does an HTTP post to the given address. The data in the quotes is passed in the post. The "sprunge=" part sets up a fieldname - the part that follows is what is associated with the name. The "<" tells curl to send data from the file descriptor that follows it. The "-" in bash is a file descriptor that points to stdin instead of an actual file; in this case, stdin is being piped in from vim. After we send the HTTP post to sprunge.us, it will give back a url that points to the data you just sent. | xclip xclip is a utility that lets you put stuff in your clipboard or selection buffer. This part uses a bash pipe ( | ) to redirect the stdout of the previous command to the stdin of the next command. So, we're capturing the URL that curl gave us and putting it into the selection buffer, ready to paste into IRC or a forum. Notes: Of course, for this to work, you must have curl (which comes by default on most distroes), and xclip installed. When you share the url, you can append "?lang" to highlight and have line numbers. Check out http://sprunge.us/BZXV?log for line numbers and http://sprunge.us/BZXV?ruby for highlighting. If you prefer to use ctrl-v (paste from clipboard) instead of middle-click (paste from selection buffer), look up options on xclip - you can do that. Show Sample Output


    17
    :w !curl -F "sprunge=<-" http://sprunge.us | xclip
    shawnjgoff · 2010-04-25 00:43:37 3

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