Commands by tonk (1)

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Alert visually until any key is pressed
I learned a few things reading this command. But I did run into a few issues: 1. On systems that don't use GNU echo (e.g. macOS 10.14.5 Mojave), the e option may not be supported. In this case ANSI escape codes will echoed as text and the terminal will not flash, like this: \e[?5h\e[38;5;1m A L E R T Thu Jun 20 16:31:29 PDT 2019 2. Since the read command strips\ignores leading backslashes, if a user types the backslash character once in the loop, it will not break. Typing backslash twice in a loop will break as expected. 3. The foreground color is set to red (\e[38;5;1m) on every loop. This could be set once before we call while, and then reset once when the loop breaks. 4. Instead of resetting the foreground color when it breaks, the video mode is set back to normal (\e[?5l). This has the effect of leaving the terminal text red until it is manually reset. The alternative I'm proposing here addresses these issues. I tested it on macOS and Arch Linux.

Check a server is up. If it isn't mail me.
This version uses netcat to check a particular service.

print offsets of file disk for losetup/loop-mount
If you want to mount partitions of an disk image, you need the offsets and sizes of the partitions. This command prints them in the format that losetup understands.

Printable random characters
Reads psuedorandom bytes from /dev/urandom, filtering out non-printable ones. Other character classes can be used, such as [:alpha:], [:digit:] and [:alnum:]. To get a string of 10 lowercase letters: $ tr -dc '[:lower:]' < /dev/urandom | head -c 10

to see about php configure
see about php install configure

Keep from having to adjust your volume constantly
Run this in the directory you store your music in. mp3gain and vorbisgain applies the ReplayGain normalization routine to mp3 and ogg files (respectively) in a reversible way. ReplayGain uses psychoacoustic analysis to make all files sound about the same loudness, so you don't get knocked out of your chair by loud songs after cranking up the volume on quieter ones.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Download and extract a *tar.gz file with curl.

Random IPv4 address

use the real 'rm', distribution brain-damage notwithstanding
The backslash avoids any 'rm' alias that might be present and runs the 'rm' command in $PATH instead. In a misguided attempt to be more "friendly", some Linux distributions (or sites/etc.) alias 'rm' to 'rm -i'. Unfortunately, this trains users to expect that files won't actually be deleted until they okay it. This expectation will fail with catastrophic results when they use other distributions, move to other sites, etc., and doesn't really even work 100% even with the alias. It's too late to fix 'rm', but '\rm' should work everywhere (under bash).


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