Commands by unixmonkey611 (2)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Suspend an ssh session.
This must be typed before any other characters have been entered on the line. Use fg, as usual, to resume the ssh session.

Sort on multiple dis-contiguous keys/fields (can even specify key number/field from the end)
Notes: 1) -n-1 means sort key is the last field 2) -l is important if each separate record is on a new line (usually so for text files) 3) -j tells msort not to create log file (msort.log) in the working directory 4) may need to install msort package. 5) msort does lot more. Check man msort

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX

Rename files in batch

Url Encode
Returns URL Encoded string from input ($1).

Socksify any program to avoid restrictive firwalls
Require: - tsocks (deb pkg) - A working SOCKS proxy. It's easy with ssh: $ ssh -N -D localhost:1080 your.home.pc -p 443 - tsocks configuration in your /etc/tsocks.conf (for the previous): server = 127.0.0.1 server_port = 1080

Delete all files by extension
This is a correction to https://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/22134 Use `-name` instead of `-iname`, because case-sensitivity is probably important when we're dealing with filenames. It's true that extensions are often capitalised (e.g., "something.JPG"), so choose whatever's appropriate. However, what is appropriate is the quoting of the name pattern, so the shell doesn't expand it incorrectly. Finally, `-delete` is clearer.

Copy a directory recursively without data/files

generate file list modified since last commit and export to tar file
################################################################################ # get all modified files since last commit and zip them to upload to live server ################################################################################ # delete previous tar output file rm mytarfile.tar -rf #rm c:/tarOutput/*.* -rf # get last commit id and store in variable declare RESULT=$(git log --format="%H" | head -n1) # generate file list and export to tar file git diff-tree -r --no-commit-id --name-only --diff-filter=ACMRT $RESULT | xargs tar -rf mytarfile.tar # extract tar files to specified location tar -xf mytarfile.tar -C c:/tarOutput


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