Commands by wanker (1)

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Edit the /etc/sudoers config file the right way.
'visudo' is installed by default on most Unix-like systems. If not installed, you can get it from the 'sudo' package. 'visudo' will use the text editor found in your $EDITOR variable, whether it's vi, vim, emacs, nano or gedit. After making changes to the /etc/sudoers file, visudo will check for syntax errors, and notify you of them. This is better than 'vi /etc/sudoers', because of this capability. Rule #1 of system administration- if there is a tool that exists for editing config files, use the tool.

Get the /dev/disk/by-id fragment for a physical drive
Substitute for #11720 Can probably be even shorter and easier.

Start another X session in a window
You might have Xnest (older) rather than Xephyr. You can experiment with other desktops eg: startx /usr/bin/start-kde -- /usr/bin/Xephyr :2 You can start X on a remote machine (although I'd recommend vnc for anything slower than a LAN): startx /usr/bin/ssh -X gnome-session -- /usr/bin/Xephyr :2 Or just start another X session locally talking to the remote backend:

Get the date for the last Saturday of a given month
If your locale has Monday as the first day of the week, like mine in the UK, change the two $7 into $6

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

List all symbolic links in current directory
why go through the hard way? use find with -type l

show the date every rpm was installed
the newest rpms are at the top; individual packages can also be queried this way: rpm --last -q package

Create a continuous digital clock in Linux terminal
Source: http://www.my-guides.net/en/guides/linux/364-how-to-create-a-continuous-digital-clock-in-linux-terminal

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Ease your directory exploration
Usage : tt [OCCURRENCE] tt will display a tree from your actual path tt .svn will display only line containing .svn


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