Commands by x0a (1)

  • example or test, basic awareness on app state, mostly for copy-paste reasons, requires auditd (ausyscall), rekt echoing (everything here is rekt) Show Sample Output


    0
    pgrep -f bash | while read PMATCH;do echo "$PMATCH # $(grep -e nr_involuntary_switches /proc/$PMATCH/sched|tr -d '\040\011\012\015') # [sysc]:$(ausyscall $(cat /proc/$PMATCH/syscall|cut -d' ' -f1))"; done;
    x0a · 2018-10-29 20:06:05 0

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