Commands tagged qpdf (2)

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Determine an image's dimensions
Simple use of ImageMagick identify function.

Find the package that installed a command

File rotation without rename command
Rotates log files with "gz"-extension in a directory for 7 days and enumerates the number in file name. i.e.: logfile.1.gz > logfile.2.gz I needed this line due to the limitations on AIX Unix systems which do not ship with the rename command.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Generate a ZenCart-style MD5 password hash.
ZenCart uses a MD5 with a salt to secure its passwords. If you need to forcibly change someone's password to a known value within the database, this one-liner can generate the password. Change the value of 'p' to the password you want.

Colorized JSON pretty printing
Uses pygmentize and python to create indented and colorized JSON output

Get the time since epoch
Get the time since epoch. Useful when working with commands and logs which use this format.

List open files that have no links to them on the filesystem
I have come across a situation in the past where someone has unlinked a file by running an 'rm' command against it while it was still being written to by a running process. The problem manifested itself when a 'df' command showed a filesystem at 100%, but this did not match the total value of a 'du -sk *'. When this happens, the process continues to write to the file but you can no longer see the file on the filesystem. Stopping and starting the process will, more often than not, get rid of the unlinked file, however this is not always possible on a live server. When you are in this situation you can use the 'lsof' command above to get the PID of the process that owns the file (in the sample output this is 23521). Run the following command to see a sym-link to the file (marked as deleted): $ cd /proc/23521/fd && ls -l Truncate the sym-link to regain your disk space: $ > /proc/23521/fd/3 I should point out that this is pretty brutal and *could* potentially destabilise your system depending on what process the file belongs to that you are truncating.

Give all those pictures the same name format, trailing zeros please for the right order, offset to merge different collections of pictures
When you have different digital cameras, different people, friends and you want to merge all those pictures together, then you get files with same names or files with 3 and 4 digit numbers etc. The result is a mess if you copy it together into one directory. But if you can add an offset to the picture number and set the number of leading zeros in the file name's number then you can manage. OFFS != 0 and LZ the same as the files currently have is not supported. Or left as an exercise, hoho ;) I love NF="${NF/#+(0)/}",it looks like a magic bash spell.


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