Commands tagged tokenizer (4)

  • This one-liner will use strace to attach to all of the currently running apache processes output and piped from the initial "ps auxw" command into some awk. Show Sample Output


    7
    ps auxw | grep sbin/apache | awk '{print"-p " $2}' | xargs strace
    px · 2011-03-14 21:45:22 7
  • This version also attaches to new processes forked by the parent apache process. That way you can trace all current and *future* apache processes.


    1
    ps auxw | grep sbin/apache | awk '{print"-p " $2}' | xargs strace -f
    msealand · 2013-02-19 19:14:57 0

  • 0
    pgrep -f /usr/sbin/httpd | awk '{print"-p " $1}' | xargs strace
    savagemike · 2015-06-10 22:55:35 0

  • -1
    ps -C apache o pid= | sed 's/^/-p /' | xargs strace
    depesz · 2011-03-15 08:46:33 0

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