Commands tagged dsmemberutil (1)

  • Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership. NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname. Show Sample Output


    -1
    members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
    eduo · 2012-05-20 11:34:33 0

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list files recursively by size

Show the power of the home row on the Dvorak Keyboard layout
Quick and dirty command that counts how many words can be typed just using the home row on the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout from a dictionary file, in this case /usr/share/dict/words. According to the regular expression supplied, each word must contain all the keys on the Dvorak home row, and no other characters. For comparison, I've shown how many words are installed in my dictionary, how many can be typed with just the Dvorak home row and how many can be typed with just the QWERTY home row in the sample output. Nearly 10 times the amount. If you want to see the words, remove the -c switch, and each word will be printed out.

move you up one directory quickly
In bash, this turns on auto cd. If a command is just a directory name, it cd's into that directory.

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
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Convert CSV to JSON
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I did not know this, i'd like to share...

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Sum columns from CSV column $COL


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