Commands tagged dsmemberutil (1)

  • Group membership in OS X is a mish-mash of standards that end up meaning there's almost a half-dozen of ways to belong to a group, what with group inheritance and automatic assignment. This means there's no easy command to find out all groups a user belongs to. The only sensible way then is to list all users and then query each user for membership. NOTE: This is a function. Once input you can execute it by calling with a groupname. Show Sample Output


    -1
    members () { dscl . -list /Users | while read user; do printf "$user "; dsmemberutil checkmembership -U "$user" -G "$*"; done | grep "is a member" | cut -d " " -f 1; };
    eduo · 2012-05-20 11:34:33 0

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