Commands tagged https_proxy (1)

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Creating ISO Images from CDs/DVDs
create an iso from your cd/dvd-rom device . You need to umount /dev/cdrom before using the cli

Terrorist threat level text
This line provides the same result by reading the output of a less arbitrary value. This is a personal choice on the matter, and the result on different machines may vary.

Oneliner to get domain names list of all existing domain names (from wikipedia)
Quietly get a webpage from wikipedia: curl -s By default, don't output anything: sed -n Search for interesting lines: /<tr valign="top">/ With the matching lines: {} Search and replace any html tags: s/<[^>]*>//g Finally print the result: p

KDE Mixer Master Mute/Unmute
arguably better than using the driver interface. lots of potentially cool stuff to be done w/ the dcop client.

Create an audio test CD of sine waves from 1 to 99 Hz
This command creates and burns a gapless audio CD with 99 tracks. Each track is a 30 second sine wave, the first is 1 Hz, the second 2 Hz, and so on, up to 99 Hz. This is useful for testing audio systems (how low can your bass go?) and for creating the constant vibrations needed to make non-Newtonian fluids (like cornstarch and water) crawl around. Note, this temporarily creates 500MB of .cdda files in the current directory. If you don't use the "rm" at the end of the command, you can burn more disks using $ cdrdao write cdrdao.toc Prerequisites: a blank CD-R in /dev/cdrw, sox (http://sox.sourceforge.net/), and cdrdao (http://cdrdao.sourceforge.net/). I'm also assuming a recent version of bash for the brace expansion (which just looks nicer than using seq(1), but isn't necessary).

find files in a date range
Find files in a specific date range - in this case, the first half of last year. -newermt = modification time of the file is more recent than this date GNU find allows any date specfication that GNU date would accept, e.g. $ find . -type f -newermt "3 years ago" ! -newermt "2 years ago" or $ find . -type f -newermt "last monday"

move you up one directory quickly
Alias a single character 'b' to move to parent directory. Put it into your .bashrc or .profile file. Using "cd .." is one of the most repetitive sequence of characters you'll in the command line. Bring it down to two keys 'b' and 'enter'. It stands for "back" Also useful to have multiple: alias b='cd ../' alias bb='cd ../../' alias bbb='cd ../../../' alias bbbb='cd ../../../../'

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Mirror rubygems.org
https://github.com/rubygems/rubygems-mirror/issues/20

Find how much of your life you've wasted coding in the current directory
Finds all C++, Python, SWIG files in your present directory (uses "*" rather than "." to exclude invisibles) and counts how many lines are in them. Returns only the last line (the total).


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