Commands tagged wrap (2)

  • wraps text lines at the specified width (90 here). -s option is to force to wrap on blank characters -b count bytes instead of columns


    12
    fold -s -w 90 file.txt
    vincentp · 2009-05-11 23:00:25 1
  • This *does not change the video encoding*, so it's fast (almost purely I/O-bound) and results in a file of nearly the same size. However, OSX (and possibly other programs) will more easily play/seek the file when wrapped as MOV. For example, you can QuickLook the resulting file. This basically does the same as the commercial ClipWrap program, except using the free program ffmpeg. Show Sample Output


    0
    ffmpeg -i "input.mts" -vcodec copy -acodec pcm_s16le "output.mov"
    lgarron · 2014-01-24 13:00:07 0

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