rpm --querytags | egrep -v HEADERIMMUTABLE | sort | while read tag ; do rpm -q --queryformat "$tag: [%{$tag} ]\n" -p $SomeRPMfile ; done

Dump an rpm's package details (besides the files)

If you want to relocate a package on your own, or you just want to know what those PREIN/UN and POSTIN/UN scripts will do, this will dump out all that detail simply. You may want to expand the egrep out other verbose flags like CHANGELOGTEXT etc, as your needs require. It isn't clear, but the formatting around $tag is important: %{$tag} just prints out the first line, while [%{$tag }] iterates thru multi-line output, joining the lines with a space (yes, there's a space between the g and } characters. To break it out for all newlines, use [%{$tag\n}] but the output will be long. This is aside from rpm2cpio | cpio -ivd to extract the package files.

0
2010-03-25 05:40:48

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What do you think?

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