Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

UpGuard checks and validates configurations for every major OS, network device, and cloud provider.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands by nnsense from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by nnsense - 8 results
dockpage() { lynx -width=180 --dump https://docs.docker.com/v1.11/engine/reference/commandline/$1/ | sed -n '/^Usage/,/On this page/{/On this page/b;p}'; }
2017-09-18 23:53:34
User: nnsense
Functions: sed
0

Docker's local man pages are (often) half of what you have online, so I wanted that as local man.

Install lynx and run my oneliner, then use as follows:

dockpage

Adjust lynx's page width at will

alias dockps='docker ps --format "table {{.ID}}\t{{.Image}}\t{{.Status}}\t{{.Names}}"'
2017-09-18 23:46:47
User: nnsense
Functions: alias ps
0

Usefull, for example, when many ports are exposed and the docker ps output looks cluttered.

showip() { nmcli connection show $1|grep ipv4.addresses|awk '{print $2}' ; }
2015-05-13 16:24:28
User: nnsense
Functions: awk grep
1

Sometimes it's useful to output just the ip address. Or some other information, changing the "ipv4.addresses" in command. The power of awk! Show all possible "greps" with

nmcli connection show [yourInterfaceNameHere]
bind '"<ctrl+v><functionKey>":"command\n"'
2015-05-11 17:59:09
User: nnsense
1

This is a common use of bind. Hitting any key after will output the key's character sequence. This makes possible using it into a bind command. So pressing ctrl+v and then F2 will output "^[[12~", once binded every time you'll press the function key F2 it will execute your command. Added the \n to make it execute it as well.

mosth() { history | awk '{CMD[$2]++;count++;}END { for (a in CMD)print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a;}' | grep -v "./" | column -c3 -s " " -t | sort -nr | nl | head -n10; }
2015-05-11 17:41:55
User: nnsense
Functions: awk column grep head nl sort
1

I copied this (let's be honest) somewhere on internet and I just made it as a function ready to be used as alias. It shows the 10 most used commands from history. This seems to be just another "most used commands from history", but hey.. this is a function!!! :D

fileinfo() { RPMQF=$(rpm -qf $1); RPMQL=$(rpm -ql $RPMQF);echo "man page:";whatis $(basename $1); echo "Services:"; echo -e "$RPMQL\n"|grep -P "\.service";echo "Config files:";rpm -qc $RPMQF;echo "Provided by:" $RPMQF; }
2015-05-11 16:46:01
User: nnsense
Functions: basename echo grep rpm whatis
2

Many times I give the same commands in loop to find informations about a file. I use this as an alias to summarize that informations in a single command. Now with variables! :D

qf2s() { rpm -ql $(rpm -qf $1)|grep -P "\.service"; }
2015-05-11 16:32:16
User: nnsense
Functions: grep rpm
1

I use this as an alias to get all .service files related a single installed file/conf (if it has services, of course).

For rpm based systems ;)

cdls() { if [[ $1 != "" ]] ; then cd $1; ls; else ls; fi };
2015-05-11 15:52:09
User: nnsense
Functions: cd
0

Not really alternative, just giving a different behavior listing current directory if no directory given.