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Commands using nl from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using nl - 19 results
git log --oneline | nl -v0 | sed 's/^ \+/&HEAD~/'
2015-11-23 21:35:57
User: flatcap
Functions: nl sed
Tags: git sed nl git-log

Print a git log (in reverse order) giving a reference relative to HEAD.

HEAD (the current revision) can also be referred to as HEAD~0

The previous revision is HEAD~1 then HEAD~2 etc.


Add line numbers to the git output, starting at zero:

... | nl -v0 | ...


Insert the string 'HEAD~' before the number using sed:

... | sed 's/^ \+/&HEAD~/'


Thanks to bartonski for the idea :-)

mosth() { history | awk '{CMD[$2]++;count++;}END { for (a in CMD)print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a;}' | grep -v "./" | column -c3 -s " " -t | sort -nr | nl | head -n10; }
2015-05-11 17:41:55
User: nnsense
Functions: awk column grep head nl sort

I copied this (let's be honest) somewhere on internet and I just made it as a function ready to be used as alias. It shows the 10 most used commands from history. This seems to be just another "most used commands from history", but hey.. this is a function!!! :D

read -p "Please enter the 4chan url: "|egrep '//i.4cdn.org/[a-z0-9]+/src/([0-9]*).(jpg|png|gif)' - -o|nl -s https:|cut -c7-|uniq|wget -nc -i - --random-wait
history | awk '{CMD[$4]++;count++;} END { for (a in CMD )print CMD[a] " " CMD[a]/count*100 "% " a }' | sort -nr | nl | column -t | head -n 10
nl FILE_NAME | tail -n 1
2013-07-04 21:54:59
User: P3ter
Functions: nl tail

This command print the last line of a file with in first position the total lines number.

rpm -qa --queryformat '%{size} %{name}-%{version}-%{release}\n' | sort -k 1,1 -rn | nl | head -16
2013-03-19 21:10:54
User: mpb
Functions: head nl rpm sort

Interesting to see which packages are larger than the kernel package.

Useful to understand which RPMs might be candidates to remove if drive space is restricted.

nl -ba FILE | sort -nr | cut -f2-
2012-06-24 23:07:06
User: maher
Functions: cut nl sort

"nl -ba" numbers all lines in the file (including empty lines), "sort -nr"

sorts the lines in descending order, and the "cut" command finally removes

the line numbers again.

dng(){ local a;a=$(sed '/'"$1"'/!d' /etc/hosts |sed '=;'"${2-1,$}"'!d'|sed '/ /!d');echo $a|tr '\040' '\n'|nl -bp'[0-9]$'|less -E;export dn=$(echo $a|sed 's,.* ,,');export ip=$(echo $a|sed 's, .*,,');echo \$dn=$dn;echo \$ip=$ip;}
2012-04-01 23:57:09
User: argv
Functions: echo export less nl sed tr

usage: dng BRE [selection]

default selection is the last match

DNS is ok, but although domainnames may be easier to remember than IP numbers, it still requires typing them out. This can be error-prone. Even more so than typing IPv4 numbers, depending on the domainname, its length and complexity.

nl file.txt > file_numbered.txt
{ rm -f file10 && nl > file10; } < file10
2010-04-08 21:08:23
User: zlemini
Functions: nl rm

Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file.

The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10.

The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.

git reflog show | grep '}: commit' | nl | sort -nr | nl | sort -nr | cut --fields=1,3 | sed s/commit://g | sed -e 's/HEAD*@{[0-9]*}://g'
2end () ( export LC_ALL=C; nl -n rz $1 > $1.tmp; ${EDITOR:-vi} $1.tmp; sort $1.tmp | sed -r 's/^.*[0-9]+\t+//' > $1; rm $1.tmp; )
2010-03-06 23:02:28
User: bartonski
Functions: export nl rm sed sort

This function is used to sort selected lines of a text file to the end of that file. Especially useful in cases where human intervention is necessary to sort out parts of a file. Let's say that you have a text file which contains the words






For whatever reason, you want to sort all words rhyming with 'tough' to the bottom of the file, and all words denoting colors to the top, while keeping the order of the rest of the file intact.

'$EDITOR' will open, showing all of the lines in the given file, numbered with '0' padding. Adding a '~' to the beginning of the line will cause the line to sort to the end of the file, adding '!' will cause it to sort to the beginning.

git log --reverse --pretty=oneline | cut -c41- | nl | sort -nr
nl <filename>
2010-01-06 16:14:43
User: SuperFly
Functions: nl

Works in RHEL5 and derivatives.

file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i x86_64 |nl | tail -1 | cut -f1 -f3; file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i "mach-o object i386" |nl | tail -1 | cut -f1 -f3
2009-09-11 16:43:27
Functions: cut file grep nl tail

Not as far off as you thought, now is it?

-mac fanboy

file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -i x86_64 |nl |tail -1 |cut -f1 -f3 && file /System/Library/Extensions/*.kext/Contents/MacOS/* |grep -v x86_64 |nl |tail -1 |cut -f1 -f3
2009-09-03 14:28:02
Functions: cut file grep nl tail

Next time you see a mac fanboy bragging about 64-bitness of 10.6 give him this so he might sh?

nl filename | more
2009-05-04 07:35:16
User: haivu
Functions: nl

The nl command lists the contents of a file where is each line is prefixed by a line number. For more information about this command, check out its man page. I tested under Mac OS X and Xubuntu 9.04

rpm -qa --qf '%{SIZE} %{NAME}\n' | sort -nr | nl | head -6 # six largest RPMs
2009-03-15 22:18:17
User: mpb
Functions: head nl rpm sort

Low on disk space? Check the largest installed RPMs for delete canditates.