Commands by Karunamon (1)

  • Returns the IP, broadcast, and subnet mask of your interfaces absent any other extraneous info. I know it's a bit lame, but I've created an alias for this when I *quickly* want to know what a system's IP is. Small amounts of time add up :) Show Sample Output


    0
    ifconfig | grep inet
    Karunamon · 2012-12-05 20:54:07 6

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